2014 International Art Festival

Artist Official Entries

KATHERINA PERRY

FOREST HILLS NY USA
http://www.kap67.net
Abstract painting is an essential part of our visual world. Whether we are looking at fine art, graphic design, fashion or interior design, the influence of abstract painting is pervasive. The collision of exuberant colors and dribbles of paint is no longer as shocking today as it apparently was at the outset of abstract expressionism in 1950. To see raw pinks, cerulean blues, blazing reds, and brilliant yellows coagulating together in an exhibition in 2014 may offer the viewer a sensual delight, an offbeat eloquence, and a necessary transition from everyday life into a feeling purposeful, inexorable well being. The recent work of Katherina Perry provides us with this kind of mental and emotional awakening. Her paintings are teaming with combinations of full-throttled color. They are carefully layered, yet dynamic in their output. Whether she reflects on these varied and fertile forms in advance of painting them is an interesting question. Maybe she does, and maybe not. Ultimately it does not matter. Rather I get a sense of an overriding intuition both in her choice and placement of color. While the brightness in pigments appears consistent, her compositional development may vary dramatically from one painting to the next. Whether the surface is rectangular or square, her diversity of color and incandescent forms appear to take their own course. Some are organic, while others are geometric. In general, Perry’s paintings seem to engage marks and gestures as a kind of play as if she were in the process of inventing or discovering a unique personal language or hieroglyphic mannerism. Whatever the result, her paintings continually evolve through various modes of expression. They transmit vibrancy less according to a facile mood than the assurance that life is the force them, the perennial spur that brings her optimistic vigor into a clarity of vision as she reaches toward self-possession. For example, paintings such as Abstract 30 and Abstract 10 use similar colors, but are organized differently. Abstract 30 is a densely complex painting in which the brushwork is both large and small, both assertive and recessive. While some colors are poured or splashed against or beside one another, others are consciously brushed so as to create angles and circles that may define oppositions and contradictions within the space. From a somewhat different point of view, Abstract 10 carries the solace of a wilderness landscape, but in abstract terms. One may recall Kandinsky’s early experiments where his use of primary color ultimately loses its connection to the external visual world. However, this kind of spiritual affectation is clearly not the intention of Perry. Rather she retains a more secular approach to color that emanates from publicity photos as found in her earlier depictions of actors and superstars, such as Marilyn, Elvis, and Rita Hayworth. Perry’s paintings reside within the realm of the abstract, where they read as a distilled evocation of meaning, a private language that offers a sanctuary to the artist. At times, her painterly language suggests a means of expression that goes beyond the surface into the realm of conflict and contradiction as suggested in her fractal shapes and layering of color, visible in works such as Abstract 32 and 35. One may get the sense of an aerial landscape where earth and water coalesce, but from the vantage point of a dream in which the viewer hovers above while looking down to find one’s way. These are some of Perry’s most involved and engaging works, as they seem to suggest the Jungian unconscious, the search for the animus within the clearing of cellular shapes inextricably bound together. The fractal edges in these forms emit a feeling of intensity as the forms appear in a state of forming themselves. Again, the bright density of Perry’s colors lends an all-over affect that retains the plausibility of a unified surface. It is within this realm of unity that the shapes and colors move in and through one another, thus giving these paintings a topology or map-like presence in which the searching eye of the artist’s brush gives way to eloquence, an expressive fervor that continues to move us forward.
© KATHERINA PERRY | KAP67 EMOTIONAL STORM 130 4596
2014 Mixed Media | Kap67 Emotional Storm 130
ACRYLIC ON WOOD COVERED WITH RESIN, 23" x 23", 2013
USD $4,500
© KATHERINA PERRY | KAP67 EMOTIONAL STORM 126 4597
2014 Mixed Media | Kap67 Emotional Storm 126
ACRYLIC ON WOOD COVERED WITH RESIN, 23" x 23", 2013
USD $4,500
© KATHERINA PERRY | KAP67 EMOTIONAL STORM 121 4599
2014 Mixed Media | Kap67 Emotional Storm 121
ACRYLIC ON WOOD COVERED WITH RESIN, 23" x 23", 2013
USD $4,500
© KATHERINA PERRY | KAP67 EMOTIONAL STORM   ABS 32.2 4600
2014 Mixed Media | Kap67 Emotional Storm Abs 32.2
ACRYLIC ON WOOD COVERED WITH RESIN, 23" x 23", 2013
USD $4,500
© KATHERINA PERRY | KAP67 EMOTIONAL STORM   ABS 14 4616
2014 Mixed Media | Kap67 Emotional Storm Abs 14
ACRYLIC ON WOOD COVERED WITH RESIN, 23" x 23", 2013
USD $4,500
© KATHERINA PERRY | KAP67 EMOTIONAL STORM 1 4615
2014 Mixed Media | Kap67 Emotional Storm 1
ACRYLIC ON WOOD COVERED WITH RESIN, 23" x 23", 2013
USD $4,500